Swedish Cinnamon Toast

Making Scandinavian Cinnamon Rusks at Home


In Scandinavia, "day-old bread" is sliced and moistened in milk and/or cream, then sprinkled with sugar and cinnamon before being slowly baked in a low-temperature oven. This is the simple formula; every Scandinavian who makes this traditional toast or “cinnamon rusks” has his or her own technique. Cinnamon toast is a popular accompaniment to coffee. Scandinavian coffee is typically brewed “strong” using light-to-medium roasted beans. My Swedish grandparents had this traditional combination of cinnamon toast (kanelskorpor) and coffee every morning, though they did not make it themselves as I do. I sometimes use home-made brioche loaf for this purpose, as it produces a very light cinnamon toast or kanelskorpor. Cinnamon is a health-promoting substance in many ways. Here is an article by Dr. Joseph Mercola on the health-benefits of CINNAMON.
©M-J de Mesterton


M-J's Chopped Power-Greens Salad with Boiled Eggs

Spinach, kale, watercress (rocket), purple onion, celery and chard were finely diced and dressed with classic vinaigrette. Two boiled eggs at a deep yellow stage of cooking (not quite hard-boiled) were cut into sections and distributed on top of the chopped vegetables, which had already been tossed with vinaigrette. For visually-appealing boiled eggs, I use the method favoured by chef Jacques Pepin: with a push-pin, poke a hole in the wider end of a raw egg in its shell before lowering it into a pot of water. I simmer the egg for eight minutes, then bathe it in ice-water. The pinhole in the egg will prevent the buildup of sulfur inside the egg and thus keep the yolk from turning green, and resting the boiled egg in cold water makes it much easier to peel. This chopped power-greens salad with two eggs is very nutritious; it can of course be made without the red onion, and naturally welcomes additional ingredients such as bacon bits or shredded cheese.
©M-J de Mesterton 2019

M-J's New Mexican Chile Almonds

M-J’s Roasted New Mexican Chile Almonds, © 2007

Soak one pound (16 ounces) of raw almonds in brine (I use health-promoting Himalayan salt) and red chile powder (New Mexican is the best), for at least an hour, preferably overnight. A teaspoon of sugar or honey added to the brine will ensure that the mixture adheres to the nuts. I like to use agave nectar when it is available. Drain the almonds and spread them out on a baking sheet. Reserve the chile/salt liquid. Roast in medium-hot oven for half an hour. Test for crunchiness only when completely cooled. If they are not tasty or crunchy enough for your taste, repeat the process by just dredging the almonds in the reserved liquid, then bake again for ten to twenty minutes, being careful not to burn the nuts. Almonds ought not to be eaten raw, as they contain a small amount of cyanide until they are roasted. These roasted nuts are an excellent party offering. Roasting the nuts this way is superior to coating them with oil, because your guests, even if they're not opposed to the stuff, won't welcome it all over their clothes.

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